Thursday, 30 April 2015

Beat Your Bad Breath

What are Common Bad Breath Causes?

If you suffer from chronic, severe bad breath, also known as halitosis, it's important to identify the cause so you can determine an effective treatment.

Halitosis has many causes, including the following:

  • Tobacco use. If you smoke, quit. Your bad breath may be due to other causes, too, but tobacco use is a guarantee of bad breath. If you are ready to quit, ask your doctor or dentist for advice and support.
  • What you eat, or don't eat. Certain foods, such as garlic, contribute to bad breath, but only temporarily. Once they are absorbed into the bloodstream, the smell is expelled through the breath, but the odors remain until the body processes the food, so there’s no quick fix.
  • Dry mouth. If your mouth is extremely dry, there is not enough saliva to wash away excess food particles and bacteria, which can cause an unpleasant smell if they build up on the teeth.
  • Infections. Bad breath that seems to have no other cause may indicate an infection elsewhere in the body. If you have chronic bad breath and your dentist rules out any oral problems, see your doctor for an evaluation. Bad breath can be a sign of a range of conditions including respiratory tract infections, chronic sinusitis or bronchitis, diabetes, or liver and kidney problems, so it's important not to ignore the problem.

The best way to improve bad breath is to follow a thorough oral care routine including twice-daily tooth brushing and daily flossing to remove the food particles and bacteria that can cause bad breath. Mouthwashes only improve bad breath for the short term, and if you have a chronic problem, your dentist may suggest an antimicrobial rinse to help keep bacteria at bay.

The above article is from: OralB.com

Drs. Leaman, Setnicar & Piacsek, S.C.
James Leaman DDS, Joseph Setnicar DDS, Stacie Piacsek DDS
820 Summit Avenue
Oconomowoc, WI 53066
(262) 567-4466
LSPDental.com


Monday, 13 April 2015

Dental Health Tips

Back To Basics
Believe it or not, brushing your teeth is one of the simplest ways to help maintain your overall health.

How Dental Health Connects To Your Overall Health
This is because dental health is more connected to overall health than most people realize. In fact, doctors and scientists continue to find associations between oral disease and other diseases. Some researchers think that bacteria in the mouth - when they build up and cause inflammation and infection - can contribute to an increased risk of illness or disease elsewhere in the body.

Oral Health and Overall Health
When you have clean teeth and healthy gums, there are fewer bad bacteria to enter your bloodstream and travel to other parts of your body. But an invasive oral surgery, certain medications, or untreated gum disease due to poor oral hygiene could allow these bacteria to spread. Researchers continue to study the links between oral health and overall health.

Health
The bottom line: You can help protect and promote your overall health by maintaining good dental health. Brush your teeth twice daily and floss at least once a day.

Available For You
These days, so many products are available to help you maintain clean teeth that there is no excuse to avoid good dental care. For example, if your gums are sensitive, in general or due to a recent illness or other medical condition, don't neglect your oral health. Try using an interdental cleaner or an electric flosser (such as the Oral-B Hummingbird) to make dental care more comfortable. And you may want to use a soft-bristled toothbrush to avoid gum irritation. If you have questions about what products are right for you, ask your dentist or dental hygienist.

The above article is from: OralB.com

Monday, 6 April 2015

Promote Oral Health With Good Nutrition

Calcium And Vitamin C Promote Oral Health
Eating a variety of nutritious food is good for your overall health, including your oral health. Some vitamins in particular have demonstrated benefits to building healthy teeth, namely calcium and vitamin C, so be sure to include foods rich in these nutrients in your diet. Calcium has been shown to help build strong teeth, and vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that also plays an important role in collagen synthesis, by which it helps you develop and maintain healthy gums.

  • Calcium: Dairy products, including milk, yogurt and cheese are good sources of calcium. Many physicians recommend 1,200 to 1,500 milligrams of calcium daily for most adults, so you may want to consider a calcium supplement, especially if dairy products aren’t a regular part of your diet. Also, try switching to low-sugar or sugar-free varieties of yogurt, since sugar (and bacteria) can promote tooth decay.
  • Vitamin C: Many fruits and vegetables including berries, oranges and cantaloupe, as well as green vegetables including broccoli and spinach are excellent sources of vitamin C.

Of course, in addition to eating right, it’s important to follow a consistent dental care routine of twice-daily tooth brushing and daily flossing to promote oral health. And be sure to see your dental professional regularly and talk to them if you have questions about how your diet might affect your oral health.

The above article is from: OralB.com

Sunday, 5 April 2015