Sunday, 29 May 2016

Saturday, 28 May 2016

When Surgical Extraction of Teeth is Necessary

You want to keep your teeth for a lifetime, but circumstances can arise that prompt your dentist to recommend removing a tooth for the good of your dental health. And although many of your teeth are easily removable, it's occasionally more complicated, and requires a more involved procedure. Here's why the surgical extraction of teeth may become necessary, and how your dentist differentiates these procedures from others.

Why Can't a Tooth be Saved?
The American Dental Association (ADA) Mouth Healthy site suggests teeth are usually removed due to trauma, disease or crowding. When a tooth cannot be repaired with a filling or a crown because of an accident or extensive decay, an extraction may be your best recourse. Teeth that aren't supported by enough bone due to periodontal disease are also candidates for removal, according to Warren Dentistry, necessitating the use of a gum-protecting toothpaste like Colgate TotalÆ Clean Mint following extraction. Infected (abscessed) teeth that don't respond to root canal treatment may need to be taken out, as well.

Keep in mind it's not unusual for an orthodontist to recommend an extraction or two before orthodontic treatment begins because of crowed teeth. Similarly, wisdom teeth are frequently extracted because of the awkward position in which they grow behind your molars.

To read the entire article written by Donna Pleis, please visit Colgate.com

Sunday, 22 May 2016

Thursday, 12 May 2016

Like Parent, Like Child: Good Oral Health Starts at Home

Parents are a child's first teacher in life and play a significant role in maintaining his or her overall health. Providing oral health education to mothers and families is essential to teaching children healthy habits and preventing early childhood tooth decay, according to an article published in the May/June 2010 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD).

With all of the challenges that new parents face, they may not think much about the link between their child's oral health and overall health. In fact, an understanding of oral hygiene can help parents to prevent tooth decayóthe single most common chronic childhood disease in Americaóand to create a lifetime of healthy habits for their child.

"Ideally, the oral health education for any family will begin with prenatal education and the establishment of a dental home by the time the child is 12 to 18 months of age," says Tegwyn Brickhouse, DDS, author of the study. "Many people don't realize that the oral health of the mother affects both the infant's future oral health and the child's overall health. In fact, some studies show that periodontal disease has been linked to preterm labor. That's why pregnant women should be evaluated for cavities, poor oral hygiene, gingivitis, loose teeth and diet."

After the child is born, families should become familiar with their child's dental and oral health milestones, which will be determined by discussion with the family dentist or a pediatric dentist. Children should have their first dental visit at age 1 or within six months of the eruption of their first tooth. A dentist will be able to discuss when parents can expect to see a child's first tooth and the best technique for brushing his or her new teeth.

Diet is another factor that affects a child's oral health. Frequent and long-term exposure to liquids that contain sugars commonly results in tooth decay. In addition to eliminating sugary drinks altogether from a child's diet, parents can adopt other habits to prevent tooth decay due to beverage consumption.

"Parents should avoid giving their children milk, formula, juice or soda at naptime or nighttime," says Bruce DeGinder, DDS, MAGD, spokesperson for the AGD. "The sugars will linger on their teeth and gums for a prolonged period of time, promoting decay."

Parents are responsible for their child's oral hygiene practices and are advised to meet with a general dentist to determine the best way to establish and maintain their child's oral health. A general dentist also can provide families with oral health literature that is designed to educate both the parent and child. This education has multiple benefits; as Dr. Brickhouse notes, "Healthy teeth in early childhood can provide a positive self-image and improve the child's quality of life."

To read the entire article please visit KnowYourTeeth.com

Thursday, 5 May 2016

The Importance of a Good Diet

In a perfect world, there would be no cavities - but unfortunately that would mean there would have to be no sugar, and let’s be honest, that’s never going to happen.

Maintaining a healthy and balanced diet isn’t just important to your overall health, its important to your oral health as well. Frequent or prolonged intake of sugary foods enables bacteria to maintain an acidic environment on the surface of your teeth. Soft and sticky foods cling to the biting surfaces of the teeth and stay there until itís brushed off. Saliva will spread the sugar between the teeth, and to the front and back.

So how do cavities occur and that ugly dental decay?
Every time you eat, plaque and bacteria in your mouth mix with the sugar and starch from the food you ingest, creating an acidic environment in your mouth. This acid softens the enamel of your teeth, and without proper oral hygiene, can expose your teeth to troublesome cavities.

How to reduce the risk of decay:

  • Brush daily with fluoridated toothpaste.
  • Follow your country’s food guide necessary for a healthy diet.
  • When eating starchy foods such as bread, cereal and pasta, minimize the time teeth are exposed by eating them with meals rather than snacking on them throughout the day.
  • Substitute sugary snacks with sugar-free gum and mints. Xylitol found in some chewing gums has been found to reduce risk of cavities. This can help reduce cavities and increase saliva flow.
  • Drink high-sugar beverages through a straw, then rinse mouth with water and brush within 30 minutes. But be careful, brushing to quickly following a meal can damage your teeth’s enamel.
  • Rinsing with water after eating can help cleanse the teeth before brushing.

To read the entire article please visit Plus.HealthyTeeth.org