Friday, 24 June 2016

Gum Disease (Periodontal Disease)

Periodontal disease is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults, with 75% of adults over 35 showing problem signs.What is often referred to as the silent mouth disease, initial symptoms can easily go unnoticed.Bacteria lives in plaque, which hardens over time and can cause gum irritations such as gingivitis.

Left untreated, bacterial infections affect the gums, ligaments and bone supporting the teeth, and can enter the blood stream and may be related to other diseases such as Heart Disease and Diabetes.
  
To read the entire article , please visit plus.HealthyTeeth.org

Saturday, 11 June 2016

A Guide to Sedation Dentistry

If the thought of seeing your dentist gives you chills every six months, an anesthetic may be the solution. Sedation dentistry uses a combination of techniques, ranging from nitrous oxide or "laughing gas" to general anesthesia, to relax a patient during surgeries or otherwise uncomfortable appointments. For even the most severe dental phobias, there is no longer a reason to avoid the dentist altogether.

Settings that Practice Anti-Anxiety

The dental office has long been the most common setting for routine dental procedures that use sedation and anti-anxiety techniques. These techniques can be used for any type of dental procedure depending on the needs of the patient. Ultimately, your fears and phobias can be managed so that you can receive the dental care you require no matter where the treatment takes place.
Are You a Candidate for Sedation?

Your overall health, as well as physical and mental conditions you may be battling at the time, are important to be able to safely undergo certain types of sedation ñ especially in the dental office. Certain of these conditions may require clearance from a physician: cardiac disease, hypertension, diabetes and respiratory diseases should all be addressed prior to a given type of sedation. Your dentist will take a thorough medical history and physical assessment before proceeding, and if need be, recommend a product like Colgate® Total®  Advanced Deep Clean to get home care on the right track. He or she may also ask you to receive medical clearance from your physician.

To read the entire article written by James Burke Fine DMD, please visit Colgate.com

Drs. Leaman, Setnicar & Piacsek, S.C.
James Leaman DDS, Joseph Setnicar DDS, Stacie Piacsek DDS
820 Summit Avenue
Oconomowoc, WI 53066
(262) 567-4466
LSPDental.com

Sunday, 5 June 2016

Dental Sealants for Children

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the importance of dental sealants as a preventive dental treatment for your children!


Saturday, 4 June 2016

Do I Need a Root Canal?

If you have been experiencing problems with a tooth, you may wonder, "Do I need a root canal?" Root canals, also known as endodontic therapy, are performed when the nerve or pulp of the tooth becomes infected and inflammed due to dental decay, a cracked or broken tooth or an injury to the tooth, according to the American Dental Association. During the procedure, a dentist uses a drill to remove both the nerve and pulp and seals up the tooth to protect against further damage. Only your dentist or a dental specialist called an endodontist, can determine whether a root canal will adequately treat your problem. Here are a few possible symptoms of the need for a root canal and some steps for dealing with them.

General Possible Symptoms
The most common symptom that may indicate the need for a root canal is tooth pain, according to the American Association of Endodontists. The intensity of the pain can range from mild to severe; it may lessen or intensify throughout the day, or it may get worse only when you bite down on the tooth. Some patients experience prolonged sensitivity to hot food or liquids. Your gums may also feel tender and swollen near the problem area.

First Steps
If you notice any of the above symptoms, contact your dentist right away. Explain your symptoms by phone to a staff member, who may arrange for you to come in right away or may recommend emergency care depending on the severity of your symptoms. To soothe the pain and alleviate swelling, apply an ice pack to the outside of your jaw. 

To read the entire article written by Rebecca Desfosse, please visit Colgate.com

Drs. Leaman, Setnicar & Piacsek, S.C.
James Leaman DDS, Joseph Setnicar DDS, Stacie Piacsek DDS
820 Summit Avenue
Oconomowoc, WI 53066
(262) 567-4466
LSPDental.com