Monday, 30 January 2017

Brushing Your Kid's Teeth

It’s never too early to get children in the habit of good oral care. Of course, it’s up to parents to take the “first steps.” Finding new ways to model good dental habits and practice them with your kids is key. The sooner kids begin to take charge of their own teeth, the happier and healthier they (and you) will be. And the payoffs over a lifetime are immeasurable.

Don’t Worry-You’re Not Alone 
If you think it’s a challenge to teach your kids good oral care, you’re in good company. Tooth decay is one of the most common childhood diseases. And studies show that almost 50% of kids between six and eight have had at least one cavity.1 These are just a couple of reasons why it’s so important to help kids understand right from the start that proper dental habits are a smart idea.

To read the entire article visit OralB.com.

Sunday, 29 January 2017

Sunday, 22 January 2017

Friday, 13 January 2017

What is a Cavity and What Causes Tooth Decay?

What to Know About Cavities and Tooth Decay

While cavities are very common dental problems in both children and adults, they can be prevented. Find out what you need to know to stay ahead of cavities. 

What Exactly Is a Cavity? 
It’s actually pretty simple. Decay (or softening of enamel) happens over time and the result is a cavity-a defect left in the tooth. Teeth are covered with a hard protective top layer called enamel. But once the enamel is weakened by acids produced by bacteria, a pit or cavity is formed in or on the tooth surface. 

What Causes Cavities and Tooth Decay?
While it’s ultimately acid-producing bacteria that leads to cavity formation, the most common cause of bacterial growth is inadequate daily brushing and flossing. Certain foods (carbs) and sugary drinks contribute to cavity formation-bacteria metabolize these carbohydrates and sugars and produce cavity-forming acids. 

To read the entire article visit OralB.com.

Friday, 6 January 2017

The Difference Between Plaque and Tartar

Lots of people ask their dental professional if there’s a difference between plaque and tartar-and it’s a great question. Both plaque and tartar buildup are common dental problems. Significant plaque buildup can result in tooth decay and gum disease. Tartar is calcified plaque. Arming yourself with the facts can help you be smarter about how you care for your teeth. 

The Facts About Plaque
Plaque is sticky, colorless film containing bacteria that builds up naturally on tooth surfaces and especially along the gum line within four to 12 hours after brushing. Sugars in food and drinks can combine with plaque bacteria to release acids. These acids attack tooth enamel and break it down, which can then create cavities. Plaque bacteria can also contribute to gum disease, like gingivitis. Regular brushing and flossing are your most effective tools in the fight against plaque. If it’s not removed daily, plaque eventually accumulates and hardens into tartar.  

To read the entire article visit OralB.com.

Thursday, 5 January 2017