Monday, 26 February 2018

Is Sparkling Water Bad for My Teeth?

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Is the satisfying fizz of your favorite sparkling water putting you at risk for tooth decay? Because any drink with carbonation-including sparkling water-has a higher acid level, some reports have questioned whether sipping sparkling water will weaken your tooth enamel (the hard outer shell of your teeth where cavities first form).

So, Is Sparkling Water Affecting My Teeth?
According to available research, sparkling water is generally fine for your teeth-and here's why. In a study using teeth that were removed as a part of treatment and donated for research, researchers tested to see whether sparkling water would attack tooth enamel more aggressively than regular lab water. The result? The two forms of water were about the same in their effects on tooth enamel. This finding suggests that, even though sparkling water is slightly more acidic than ordinary water, it's all just water to your teeth. 

Tips for Enjoying Sparkling Water-and Protecting Your Teeth

  • Sparkling water is far better for your teeth than sugary drinks. In addition, be sure to drink plenty of regular, fluoridated water, too-it’s the best beverage for your teeth. Water with fluoride naturally helps fight cavities, washes away the leftover food cavity-causing bacteria feast on and keeps your mouth from becoming dry (which can put you at a higher risk of cavities). 
  • Be mindful of what’s in your sparkling water. Citrus-flavored waters often have higher acid levels that does increase the risk of damage to your enamel. Plan to enjoy these in one sitting or with meals. This way, you aren’t sipping it throughout the day and exposing your teeth over and over again to the slightly higher level of acid it contains.
  • Sparkling water brands with added sugar can no longer be considered just sparkling water. They are a sugar-sweetened beverage, which can contribute to your risk of developing cavities. So remember-sparkling or not-plain water is always the best choice.

Thursday, 22 February 2018

Monday, 12 February 2018

Tips for keeping a beautiful smile!

Keeping your teeth clean, smooth and beautiful...
Proper oral hygiene is your key to a healthy, beautiful smile. Here are our and the American Dental Association's recommendations for at home care:

  • Brush 2-3 times every day with a fluoride toothpaste (it doesn't matter which brand)
  • Floss once a day
  • Eat a healthy diet (fruits, vegetables, etc)
  • Limit consumption of sugary foods and beverages. Soda drinks can destroy teeth faster than almost anything else
  • Eliminate or at least limit use of alcohol, chewing tabacco, and cigarettes

We also recommend using an electric high-speed toothbrush in conjunction with a waterpik for your daily at-home oral care.

And don't forget six-month professional cleanings and checkups. The American Dental Association recommends checkups every six months for those ages four and older.

Professional cleanings by qualified hygienists will remove bacteria and plaque, which can cause serious dental problems if not kept in check.

If you have not been seen recently call our office for an appointment!

Monday, 5 February 2018

To Floss or Not to Floss..

Lately, there has been a lot of talk about flossing and if it is good or not! Kind of reminds me of coffee, some studies say is good for you and others say it isn't.

Our dental office believes that flossing is beneficial to a person's general oral health. Our staff is trained to address the issues of proper flossing to our patients on an individual need basis. We promote many different tools used to effectively and safely clean between the teeth.

If you are concerned with the recent news reports, please give our office a call to schedule an appointment. We will be happy to review your concerns and make sure you are properly caring for your teeth.

Do White Teeth Mean Healthy Teeth?

Learn what the American Dental Association's answer is to the question: "Do White Teeth Mean Healthy Teeth?".